Middlebury College Museum of Art

News & Events

Sunday, September 20

Friends of the Art Museum Fall Exhibition Opening

Opening Reception
Time: 5:00pm
Location: Middlebury College Museum of Art

The Friends of the Art Museum welcome friends both old and new to view the museum’s two new fall exhibits, The Art of Storytelling: Five Tales from Asia, Then and Now and Naked Truth: The Body in Early 20th Century German and Austrian Art. Hear brief remarks by Richard Saunders, director of the museum, and Sarah Laursen, assistant professor of history of art and architecture and Robert P. Youngman Curator of Asian Art. The Middlebury College Friends of the Art Museum were established in 1969 to support the college art collection and the museum’s educational programs. Many of the works they have acquired are on permanent display. Sponsored by the Middlebury College Museum of Art and the Friends of the Art Museum. A reception will follow in the lower lobby of the Mahaney Center for the Arts.

Monday, September 21

Interpreting the Mahabharata: A Conversation with Laurie Patton and Abhishek Singh

Moderated Discussion
Time: 4:30pm
Location: Mahaney Center for the Arts, Robison Concert Hall

Laurie Patton, President of Middlebury and scholar of Indian religion, and Abhishek Singh, comic book artist and author of Krishna: A Journey Within


The Mahabharata, one of India’s most ancient texts, describes a war between family members embroiled in a succession dispute. At its heart is a conversation about the ethics of war between the warrior Arjuna, who is conflicted about fighting his own kin, and his charioteer and confidant Krishna, a manifestation of the god Vishnu. Professor of History of Art and Architecture Cynthia Packert will moderate a discussion about textual and visual interpretations of this important work with Laurie Patton, President of Middlebury and scholar of Indian religion, and Abhishek Singh, comic book artist and author of Krishna: A Journey Within. A reception will follow in the Lower Lobby of the MCA.

Presented in conjunction with The Art of Storytelling: Five Tales from Asia, Then and Now, on view in the Overbrook Gallery of the Middlebury College Museum of Art from September 8 to December 13. Sponsored by the Middlebury College Museum of Art, the Friends of the Art Museum, the Rohatyn Center for Global Affairs, the Department of History of Art and Architecture, the Program in Studio Art, the Department of Religion, the Director of the Arts, the Program in Literary Studies, and the Program in South Asian Studies.

Thursday, September 24

The Divine Ideal and the Naked Truth: Representations of the Body in Ancient Greece/Rome and Modern Austria/Germany

Gallery Talk
Time: 2:30pm
Location: Middlebury College Museum of Art

Pieter Broucke, Associate Curator of Ancient Art, and Jason Vrooman, Curator of Education and Academic Programs


Highlighting art from the Middlebury College Museum of Art’s collection of antiquities and the special exhibition Naked Truth: Approaches to the Body in Early-Twentieth-Century German and Austrian Art, Pieter Broucke, Associate Curator of Ancient Art, and Jason Vrooman, Curator of Education and Academic Programs will compare classical notions of the body to modern equivalents.

Friday, September 25

Off the Wall: Informal Discussions About Art—The Resistance of Otto Dix’s Silverpoints

Art & Lunch Discussion
Time: 11:30am
Location: Mahaney Center for the Arts, Dance Theatre and Lower Lobby

James van Dyke, Assistant Professor of Modern European Art History, Department of Art History and Archaeology, University of Missouri-Columbia


Otto Dix was one of the leading German artists of the 1920s and 1930s, renowned and reviled for his brutal, exquisite renderings of scenes of sex, violence, and sexual violence. Dix advanced rapidly up the ladder of professional success in the 1920s, but also stood at the center of the Nazi campaign against modern art in the 1930s. James van Dyke, Assistant Professor of Modern European Art History, Department of Art History and Archaeology, University of Missouri-Columbia, will consider the meaning of the technique of silverpoint drawing in Dix’s work in and after 1933, in particular asking whether two portraits made and exhibited in Berlin in 1935 can be seen as sly responses to both his critics and Nazi ideology in general. Sponsored by the Middlebury College Museum of Art and the Committee on the Arts. Lunch is provided. $5 donation suggested; free to College ID cardholders.