Middlebury College Museum of Art

News & Events

Wednesday, October 1

Opening Doors: Conservation of Tibetan Tangkas from the Mead Art Museum

Illustrated Lecture
Time: 4:30pm
Location: Mahaney Center for the Arts, Concert Hall

Camille Myers Breeze, Director and Head Conservator of Museum Textile Services, Andover


Camille Myers Breeze, Director and Head Conservator of Museum Textile Services, Andover, will discuss her work cleaning, stabilizing, and repairing the fragile Tibetan scroll paintings on view in the museum’s current exhibit Picturing Enlightenment: Tibetan Tangkas from the Mead Art Museum. Co-sponsored by the Middlebury College Museum of Art and the Friends of the Art Museum.

Friday, October 3

Off the Wall: Informal Discussions About Art—The Making of Visual Weimar

Art & Lunch Discussion
Time: 12:15pm
Location: Mahaney Center for the Arts, Room 125 and Museum

Bettina Matthias, Professor of German


Professor of German Bettina Matthias will discuss the cultural and curricular backdrop to the student-curated exhibit Visual Weimar. Reflecting what emerged as a starkly visual post-war culture, artists of the Weimar Republic both participated in and challenged their contemporaries’ attempts to come to terms with the lost war and its aftermath, and their works help map the political, social, and psychological landscape of the 1920s. Taking their cues from this “map,” students from the Spring 2014 upper-level German course “Weimar Germany and Its Legacies” undertook creative first-person narrative engagements with Weimar art from the Sabarsky Foundation in New York to decipher the visual code that permeated Germany’s first and failed Republic. Enjoy further conversation over a light lunch in the lobby. Sponsored by the Middlebury College Museum of Art and the Committee on the Arts. Lunch is provided. $5 donation suggested; free to College ID cardholders.

Thursday, October 9

The Arts of Tibet

Illustrated Lecture
Time: 4:30pm
Location: Mahaney Center for the Arts, Concert Hall

Dr. Katherine Anne Paul, Curator of the Arts of Asia, the Newark Museum


To celebrate the centennial of the Newark Museum’s renowned Tibet collection in 2011, Dr. Katherine Anne Paul, Curator of the Arts of Asia, re-installed six permanent galleries of Tibetan art and created three temporary exhibitions of Tibetan art. Since her appointment at the Newark Museum in 2008 she has also created seven other exhibitions ranging from traditional to contemporary art originating in South, Southeast and East Asia. Previously, Dr. Paul was Associate Curator of Indian and Himalayan Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, where she produced nine boutique exhibitions showcasing Himalayan art. She lectures widely and holds a B.A. in Art History from Reed College and a Ph.D. in the Languages and Cultures of Asia from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she studied Tibetan, Sanskrit, and Nepali. As a Fulbright scholar, Dr. Paul lived in Nepal and has performed field research in 15 Asian nations during the past 18 years. This lecture is presented in connection with the exhibition Picturing Enlightenment: Tibetan Tangkas from the Mead Art Museum. Co-sponsored by the Middlebury College Museum of Art and the Friends of the Art Museum.

Wednesday, October 15

US vs. Art Thieves: True Stories of the FBI’s Real Indiana Jones

Illustrated Lecture
Time: 4:30pm
Location: Dana Auditorium

Robert Goldman, former federal prosecutor and advisor to the FBI’s Art Crime Team, and Robert Wittman, Special Agent and founder of the FBI’s Art Crime Team


Robert Goldman, former federal prosecutor, Special Trial Attorney and advisor to the FBI’s Art Crime Team, and private practice attorney specializing in art, antiquities, and collections law; and Robert Wittman, Special Agent, founder of the FBI’s Art Crime Team, and author of the bestselling book Priceless: How I Went Undercover to Rescue the World’s Stolen Treasures. The two will talk about their experiences recovering and litigating nearly half a billion dollars’ worth of art and cultural artifacts, including works by Cassatt, Rockwell, Grandma Moses, Goya, Brueghel, Rembrandt, Rodin, and Renoir, and items belonging to Geronimo, George Washington, Patrick Henry, Andrew Jackson, John Brown, William Penn, and Andrew Hamilton, as well as an original copy of the Bill of Rights that had been believed lost for a hundred years.

Thursday, October 23

Tibetan Sand Mandala Exhibit

Ongoing Demonstration
Time: 9:00am
Location: Davis Family Library, Atrium

The Monks of the Namgyal Monastery


On Thursday, October 23, the Monks of the Namgyal Monastery will, in the Atrium of the Davis Family Library, begin creating a sand mandala, which is a circular diagram containing sacred symbols drawn with fine, colored grains of sand. They will continue working daily 9 am–noon, and 2–4 pm. At noon on Sunday, October 26, the monks will finish the sand mandala and then dismantle it at 4 pm, at which point they’ll walk to Otter Creek to pour the sand into the water and recite prayers. All are invited to accompany them. To learn more, you can watch a video of the monks creating a sand mandala. Co-sponsored by the Middlebury College Museum of Art, the Friends of the Art Museum, the Department of History of Art and Architecture, and the Director of the Arts.

Wednesday, October 29

Ambiguity, Inquiry, Dialogue: The Visual Thinking Strategies Teaching Method and Higher Education

Illustrated Lecture
Time: 4:30pm
Location: Mahaney Center for the Arts, Room 125

Dabney Hailey, Independent Curator


Curator and educator Dabney Hailey, who was formerly Director of Academic Programs at the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University, will facilitate a discussion about an artwork to demonstrate the teaching method, Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS). She then will address some key questions: What is visual thinking (or visual literacy), why does it matter, and how might it be developed in undergraduate students? How can open-ended, rigorous discussions about art, such as VTS conversations, enable academic museums to more effectively meet and influence curricular needs across disciplines? Describing the ways in which VTS cultivates the process of inquiry, creates comfort with ambiguity, and fosters collaboration, Hailey will draw on her experiences applying the method in a range of classes (Anthropology, Biology, Business, Neuroscience, Philosophy, and Public Policy, among others) at Brandeis. Co-sponsored by the Middlebury College Museum of Art and the Friends of the Art Museum.

Friday, October 31

Off the Wall: Informal Discussions About Art—The Sabarsky Collection

Art & Lunch Discussion
Time: 12:15pm
Location: Mahaney Center for the Arts, Room 125 and Museum

Ellen Price, Curator of the Sabarsky Collection


Ellen Price, Curator of the Sabarsky Collection, will talk about prominent art dealer Serge Sabarsky, his collection, and the formation of the Neue Galerie. Enjoy further conversation over a light lunch in the lobby. Sponsored by the Middlebury College Museum of Art and the Committee on the Arts. Lunch is provided. $5 donation suggested; free to College ID cardholders. This lecture is presented in connection with the exhibition Visual Weimar.