Middlebury College Museum of Art

Thursday, February 13

Weimar, Dessau, Berlin: The Bauhaus as School and Laboratory

Opening Reception
Time: 4:30pm
Location: Mahaney Arts Center, Lower Lobby and Museum

Erin Sassin, Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture


Join Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture Erin Sassin as she considers not only the Bauhaus’s far-reaching influence on the practice and teaching of art, design, and architecture, but also its enormous social and political impacts. Hors d’oeuvres and cash bar, followed by a special performance by Assistant Professor of Music Matthew Taylor and Assistant Professor of Dance Laurel Jenkins.

Wassily Kandinsky, Kleine Welten V, 1922
Wassily Kandinsky (Russian, 1866–1944), Kleine Welten V, 1922, colored woodcut, 14 3/16 x 11 inches. Courtesy of the Sabarsky Foundation.

Wednesday, February 19

Lost Luxuries: Ancient Chinese Gold

Lecture and Opening Reception
Time: 4:30pm
Location: Mahaney Arts Center, Room 125 and Lower Lobby

Sarah Laursen, Curator of Asian Art


In ancient China, gold ornaments were potent symbols of official rank, gender, group identity, and economic status; by the early twentieth century, they were sought after by art collectors for their beauty. Join Sarah Laursen, Curator of Asian Art and Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture, for a lecture about the little-known history of early Chinese gold, followed by a reception with light refreshments in the Lower Lobby.

Sarah Laursen
Photo: Sarah Laursen

Tuesday, February 25

Secrets of Ancient Goldsmiths Demystified

Illustrated Lecture
Time: 4:30pm
Location: Mahaney Arts Center, Room 125

Jeanette K. Caines


Ancient jewelers made astounding works of art, unrivalled in modern times, without the benefit of electricity or modern equipment of any kind. How did they do it? Join Jeanette K. Caines, master goldsmith and director of Jewelry Arts Inc., for a lecture on ancient goldsmithing techniques.

Chinese gold phoenix ornament
Photo: Jeanette K. Caines, courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art