Middlebury College Museum of Art

Wednesday, April 4

Colonial Latin America: A Crossroads Between East and West

Illustrated Lecture
Time: 4:30pm
Location: Mahaney Center for the Arts, Room 125

Dennis Carr


Dennis Carr, Carolyn and Peter Lynch Curator of American Decorative Arts and Sculpture, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Beginning in the 16th century, direct trade between Europe, Asia, and the Americas spurred a remarkable interchange of artworks and artistic styles. Inspired by objects brought via the trans-Atlantic and trans-Pacific trade routes, colonial artists across the Americas—from Caracas, Venezuela, to Mexico City, to Lima, Peru—created spectacular artworks that blended Asian, indigenous, and European influences, reflecting the newly globalized world in which they were made. Offered in conjunction with the concurrent exhibition Power and Piety: Spanish Colonial Art. Sponsored by the Middlebury College Museum of Art, the Department of History of Art and Architecture, and the Friends of the Art Museum. Free

Juan Pedro Lopez, Our Lady of Guidance
Juan Pedro López, Our Lady of Guidance (Nuestra Señora de Guía), c. 1762, oil on panel. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Promised gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros in honor of Jorge Rivas.

Friday, April 6

Fridays at the Museum—Caveat Emptor: The American Historical Portrait in the Early Twentieth Century

Illustrated Lecture
Time: 12:30pm
Location: Mahaney Center for the Arts, Room 125

Richard Saunders, Museum Director and Professor of History of Art and Architecture


At the beginning of the 20th Century there was a growing appetite for American objects from the colonial period and the early Republic—particularly portraits of figures prominent in our early history. But demand exceeded supply and, as a consequence, pictures began to appear from various sources with fabricated identifications, invented provenances, and, on occasion, fraudulent artist signatures. Richard Saunders tells this story about how such subterfuge was revealed.

unknown British artist, Mrs Oxenbridge Thacher
Unknown Artist (British), Portrait of Mrs. Oxenbridge Thacher (née Sarah Kent, 1724–1764), 1749, oil on canvas, 50 1/4 x 40 inches. Collection of Middlebury College Museum of Art. Purchase with funds provided by the Electra Havemeyer Webb Memorial Fund, 2007.012.

Wednesday, April 11

Wolfgang Buttress: Art and Nature

Illustrated Lecture
Time: 4:30pm
Location: Mahaney Center for the Arts, Dance Theatre

Wolfgang Buttress, artist


Wolfgang Buttress—an award winning artist who works with public and private space, and creator of The Hive at Kew Gardens, London, an aluminum honeycomb-like structure that reacts in real time to the vibrations of a nearby bee hive—will talk about how art can explore, express, and inform our relationship with the ‘natural’ world. Sponsored by the Middlebury College Museum of Art and the Franklin Environmental Center. FREE

an evening view inside The Hive, by Wolfgang Butress
An evening view inside Wolfgang Buttress’s Hive at Kew Gardens, London

Thursday, April 12

Cameron Visiting Artist Mark Dion: Misadventures of a 21st-Century Naturalist

Artist Talk
Time: 4:30pm
Location: Twilight Auditorium

Artist Mark Dion


**NOTE: NEW DATE AND TIME**
Known best for his elaborate installations and fantastical curiosity cabinets, which often merge surprisingly disparate objects classified and arranged as so many incarnations of rare species, Mark Dion’s art questions distinctions between “objective” (“rational”) methods and “subjective” (“irrational”) influences. He returns to campus on the occasion of the Museum exhibition of prints created by the Cameron Family Arts Enrichment Fund and students in Hedya Klein’s Silkscreen and Intaglio classes. Cosponsored by the Middlebury College Museum of Art, the Program in Studio Art, the Cameron Family Arts Enrichment Fund, the Department of History of Art and Architecture, and the First Year Seminar Program.

Mark Dion, Oceanomania
Mark Dion (American, b. 1961), Oceanomania: Souvenirs from Mysterious Seas—Musée Oceanographic de Monaco, 2011, photopolymer etching on paper, 15 1/8 x 16 inches. Collection of the Middlebury College Museum of Art. Gift of the artist, 2013.008. (Photo: May Mantell Photography, Vermont)

Friday, April 13

Fridays at the Museum: Ancient Greek Coins at the Museum

Illustrated Lecture
Time: 12:30pm
Location: Mahaney Center for the Arts, Room 125

Simone Edgar Holmes ’20.5


Simone Edgar Holmes ’20.5, Intern in Ancient Art, will present her numismatic research and display proposal for the impressive collection of Ancient Greek coins that the Museum has been expanding in recent years.

AV Dinar, Bahram II, Sassanian
AV Dinar, Bahram II, Sassanian, c. 276–293 CE, gold, dia: 21mm. Collection of Middlebury College Museum of Art. Gift (by exchange) of Wilson Farnsworth, George Mead, and Henry Sheldon.

Friday, April 27

Fridays at the Museum—Fish Story: An Artistic Vision of Industry

Illustrated Lecture
Time: 12:30pm
Location: Mahaney Center for the Arts, Room 125

Laurel Rand-Lewis ’20, Robert F. Reiff Curatorial Intern


Robert F. Reiff Curatorial Intern Laurel Rand-Lewis ’20 focuses on works by Allan Sekula in the museum’s collection, discussing in particular his Fish Story (1988–2003), an extensive and provocative exploration of the international world of shipping. Sekula’s project exposes the human impact of modernized global trade and the constant forward drive of economic capital. Sponsored by the Middlebury College Museum of Art and the Friends of the Art Museum. Free

Allan Sekula, Exxon Valdez and Lead Fish, from Fish Project
Allan Sekula (American, 1951–2013), The Rechristened Exxon Valdez awaiting sea trials after repairs, National Steel and Shipbuilding Company, San Diego, August 1990; and Lead Fish, variant of a conference room designed for the Chiat/Day Advertising Agency, architect: Frank Gehry, installation at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, May 1988; from Fish Story, 1988–2003, cibachrome on paper, 28 x 39 inches and 28 x 34 inches, respectively. Collection of Middlebury College Museum of Art. Purchase with funds provided by the Christian A. Johnson Memorial Art Acquisition Fund, 2009.047.

Sunday, April 29

Film Screening of “Human Flow” by Ai Weiwei and Live Webcast of Q&A with the Artist

Film Screen/Artist Q&A
Time: 4:45pm
Location: McCullough Student Center, Wilson Hall

Ai Weiwei, Artist


EVENT DETAILS

Doors open at 4:45 PM. Live webcast of Q&A with Mr. Ai will begin at 5:00 PM. Film screening will follow at 5:30 PM. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis.

This epic film by renowned artist Ai Weiwei is a detailed and heartbreaking exploration of the global refugee crisis. Captured over the course of a year in 23 countries, the film follows a chain of urgent stories that stretches through Afghanistan, Greece, Iraq, Kenya, Mexico, Turkey, and beyond. From teeming refugee camps to perilous ocean crossings to barbed-wire borders, Human Flow witnesses its subjects’ desperate search for safety, shelter, and justice. (2017, dir. Ai Weiwei, 140 min.)

Q&A with Ai Weiwei will be webcast live from the University of Chicago at 5:00 PM. Mr. Ai will be taking questions from screening audiences across the country.

ASKING AI WEIWEI A QUESTION

Members of the audience can ask Ai Weiwei a question during the livestream. The organizers will crowdsource questions before and during the event. Once the film screening begins, members of the audience can submit their questions through sli.do (totally free, and accessible via smartphone, tablet and computer). Viewers can also submit questions in advance - the organizers will start accepting questions on April 23rd.

Participants log on to sli.do with the event code “humanity” to submit questions. The rest of the audience will cast votes for the questions they’d like Ai Weiwei to respond to. The questions receiving the most votes will be given to the moderator to pose to Ai Weiwei. Participants will also be able to comment on the questions on the sli.do event page. The organizers will also use sli.do during the event to poll the audience. **Note** There is no guarantee that a question from the Middlebury audience will be selected.

PRAISE FOR HUMAN FLOW

“...an open-hearted and intricately woven mosaic that travels to 23 different countries (thanks to more than 2,000 crew members) in order to show both the breadth of the refugee crisis as well as its dehumanizing volume...Human Flow is an epic portrait of mass migration that understands how a lack of empathy often stems from a failure of imagination.” —Indiewire

“There are moments in Human Flow, a bracing, often strangely beautiful movie by the artist Ai Weiwei, when it can be hard to see the individuals who make up the roiling, surging rivers onscreen. This difficulty in isolating specific people — really seeing them as sovereign beings rather than as an undifferentiated mass — is crucial to the meaning of the documentary, which charts the global refugee and migrant crisis. ... What Mr. Ai seeks is to go far beyond the nightly news; he wants to give you a sense of the scale of the crisis, its terrifying, world-swallowing immensity.” —New York Times

image still from Human Flow, by Ai Weiwei
image still from Human Flow, by Ai Weiwei