Middlebury College Museum of Art

Friday, April 7

Off the Wall: Informal Discussions About Art—Enrique Chagoya: Art as Dissent

Art & Lunch Discussion
Time: 12:15pm
Location: Mahaney Center for the Arts, Room 125 and Lower Lobby

Juliana E. Dunn ’19, Robert F. Reiff Curatorial Intern


Mexican American artist Enrique Chagoya is a self-proclaimed “cultural cannibal” who believes that art thrives in the midst of social political crisis. Deftly imbuing borrowed images with contemporary political critique, Chagoya reconsiders Los Caprichos in an homage to Francisco de Goya. His dark and biting satirical works juxtapose popular American iconography, from Disney princesses to political figures, with grotesque demons, reminding us that history and culture are constructed by those in power and are hardly as pretty as they seem. Join Juliana to explore the museum’s holdings of Chagoya’s Clinton-era etchings, Return to Goya’s Los Caprichos. Enjoy further conversation over a light lunch in the lobby. Sponsored by the Middlebury College Museum of Art, the Director of the Arts, and the Committee on the Arts. Lunch is provided. $5 donation suggested; free to College ID cardholders.

Enrique Chagoya

Wednesday, April 12

Grieving through Stone and Clay: Affect in Chinese Funerary Art of the Middle Period

Illustrated Lecture
Time: 4:30pm
Location: Mahaney Center for the Arts, Room 125

Jeehee Hong, Associate Professor of East Asian Art History at McGill University and current Fellow at the Clark Art Institute


Jeehee Hong, Associate Professor of East Asian Art History at McGill University and current Fellow at the Clark Art Institute, examines representations of grief in Chinese middle-period (9th-14th centuries) funerary contexts. Hong shows that fictional or localized mourners were “inserted” into monuments to transmit corporeal and raw emotions. Sponsored by the Department of History, the Department of History of Art and Architecture, the Middlebury College Museum of Art, and the Program in East Asian Studies.

Buddhas Nirvāṇa, Hancheng Tomb

Thursday, April 13

This is a Portrait if I Say So

Illustrated Lecture
Time: 4:30pm
Location: Mahaney Center for the Arts, Room 125

Anne Goodyear, co-director, Bowdoin College Museum of Art


Anne Goodyear, co-director of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art and co-author of This is a Portrait if I Say So: Identity in American Art, 1912 to Today, will discuss how portraiture evolved largely as a genre based on mimesis to one stressing conceptual and symbolic associations between artist and subject. Artists considered range from Georgia O’Keeffe and Marcel Duchamp to Jasper Johns and Yoko Ono. Presented in conjunction with the concurrent exhibition American Faces: A Cultural History of Portraiture and Identity. Cosponsored by the Middlebury College Museum of Art, the Department of History of Art and Architecture, and the Director of the Arts.

cover of This is a Portrait if I Say So

Friday, April 21

Photographic Portraiture in American Faces

Gallery Talk
Time: 12:15pm
Location: Middlebury College Museum of Art, Johnson Gallery

James Blair, Photographer


As a celebrated photographer for National Geographic, local resident James Blair has traveled to every continent on Earth. His photographs are published in numerous books and are included in the permanent collections of the National Portrait Gallery, the Museum of Modern Art, the Portland (Oregon) Museum of Art, and the Carnegie Museum of Art (Pittsburgh). He will discuss photographic portraiture in the exhibition American Faces: A Cultural History of Portraiture and Identity.

quarter-plate daguerreotype of John Deere

Thursday, April 27

Beauty and Self Image

Illustrated Lecture
Time: 4:30pm
Location: Mahaney Center for the Arts, Dance Theatre

Nancy Etcoff, Assistant Clinical Professor and Psychologist, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital


Nancy Etcoff—Assistant Clinical Professor and Psychologist, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, TED talk presenter, and author of Survival of the Prettiest (2000), the first in-depth scientific inquiry into the nature of  human beauty—sheds light on why we devour fashion magazines, check our waistlines, and gaze longingly at objects of desire. Presented in conjunction with the concurrent exhibition American Faces: A Cultural History of Portraiture and Identity. Cosponsored by the Middlebury College Museum of Art, the Academic Enrichment Fund, the Department of History of Art and Architecture, the Director of the Arts, the Committee on the Arts, and the Department of Psychology.

nancy etcoff, survival of the prettiest