Middlebury College Museum of Art

Exhibitions

Votes...for Women?

September 13–December 8, 2019

“Should American women vote?” Why was this even a question? In the world’s most prominent democracy, why haven’t women been allowed to participate fully from the start? While a relative few voices publicly questioned the prohibition against women voting in the decades following the country’s founding, most Americans did not wholeheartedly consider this question until the last century. The activists who took on the cause of woman suffrage came from all walks of life and all corners of the country. This exhibit of vintage photographs, banners, and memorabilia coincides with the 100th anniversary of the campaign to ratify the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution in 1920.

Press Images


The suffragette hikers led by General Rosalie Jones at the Capitol
The suffragette “hikers” led by General Rosalie Jones at the Capitol, about to march up Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D.C., February 27, 1913. Photograph by Underwood & Underwood. Collection of Middlebury College Museum of Art, purchase with funds provided by the the Memorial Art Acquisition Fund and the Reva B. Seybolt ’72 Art Acquisition Fund, 2018.
Suffrage Parade on 5th Avenue, October 23, 1915
Suffrage Parade on 5th Avenue, [New York, NY, October 23, 1915]. Photograph by Underwood & Underwood. Collection of Middlebury College Museum of Art, purchase with funds provided by the the Memorial Art Acquisition Fund and the Reva B. Seybolt ’72 Art Acquisition Fund, 2018.