Middlebury College Museum of Art

Exhibitions

Permanent Collection Galleries

Catherine Opie, Portrait of Diane di Massa

This new installation of Middlebury’s art collection invites visitors to join a conversation sparked by objects created throughout time and around the globe. Arranged thematically to highlight similarities as well as differences across cultures, the reinstalled galleries represent steps in the ongoing journey toward a more inclusive and accessible presentation of the many stories art can tell.

 

Emily Mason, Scarlet Log

Historically, museums in the United States have prioritized art made by White men. As a result, the important contributions of many artists have been absorbed, marginalized, overlooked, or ignored—especially those of women and BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and people of color) artists. While the present display features more diverse personal and artistic identities than ever before (with the highest increase among Black, women, and LGBTQIA+ artists), much work lies ahead.

As the curators continue on the path toward greater equity in the collection and how it is displayed in the galleries, the quarterly rotation of photographs, prints, drawings, and other light-sensitive pieces will ensure that diverse artistic perspectives regularly refresh the narratives presented. To challenge a single, authoritative story of art further, each gallery dedicates space to a “Label Talk” dialogue, where multiple people respond to a single work of art.

Sabra Field, Cloud WayBerlin Painter vase

The museum’s staff invites you, the visitor, to activate the collection anew by considering your own responses to works of art (and to the interpretations) that delight, engage, challenge, or frustrate you. Because a museum is always a work in progress, your responses, ideas, and questions are welcomed in the comment box at the main museum entrance, online via social media (we’re @middartmuseum on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram), or via email to the museum.

Kehinde Wiley, Thomas Armory I

Image credits:
1: Catherine Opie (American, born 1961), Diane di Massa [detail], 1994, chromogenic color print on paper, 20 x 16 inches. Collection of Middlebury College Museum of Art. Purchase with funds provided by the Christian A. Johnson Memorial Art Acquisition Fund, 2008.010. Copyright © Catherine Opie. Courtesty Regen Projects, Los Angeles. 2: Emily Mason (American, 1932–2019), A Scarlet Log, 1992, oil on canvas, 54 x 50 inches. Collection of Middlebury College Museum of Art. Gift of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York; Hassam, Speicher, Betts and Symons Funds 1995, 1995.002. 3: Sabra Field (American, born 1935), Cloud Way, 2016, woodcut print on paper, 20 x 19 inches. Collection of Middlebury College Museum of Art. Gift of the artist. Copyright © Sabra Field. 4: Attributed to the Berlin Painter (Greek, Attic, active c. 490–460s B.C.E.), Red-Figure Neck Amphora (Doubleen) Depicting Nike, c. 470 B.C.E., Early Classical period, terracotta, H. 14 1/2 x dia. 7 5/8 inches. Collection of Middlebury College Museum of Art. Purchase with funds provided by the Christian A. Johnson Memorial Art Acquisition Fund, 2001.019. (Photo: Ken Burris) 5: Kehinde Wiley (American, born 1977), Thomas Armory I, 2006, oil on canvas, 26 1/4 × 22 1/8 inches. Collection of Middlebury College Museum of Art. Purchase with funds provided by the Walter Cerf Art Fund, the Friends of Art Acquisition Fund, the Reva B. Seybolt ’72 Art Acquisition Fund, the Calvert H. Seybolt ’80 Art Acquisition Fund, and the G. Crossan Seybolt ’77 Art Acquisition Fund, 2020.002. Copyright © Kehinde Wiley. Courtesy of Sean Kelly, New York.